The Six Queer Things by Christopher St John Sprigg

Majorie Easton lives with her uncle, keeping house for him, until the day when she can marry her gentleman friend, Ted. But life isn’t easy for her, as her uncle is something of a miser, so when she receives an intriguing offer from a peculiar man, one Michael Crispin, she decides to put her old life behind her. It’s safe to say, this is something of a mistake.

As Crispin helps to develop Majorie’s potential as a spirit medium, her mental health takes a marked tumble downhill but soon things take a deadly turn. As a murder takes place in Crispin’s household, it seems that things can’t get any worse. Is there anyone who can save the day? Enter Inspector Morgan – but can he work out the rationale behind the Six Queer Things?

Another quickie review, I’m afraid, and another book of two halves, just like Murder In The Museum. This time, the first half is a remarkably tense woman-in-peril tale, along the lines of Some Must Watch, but, to me at least, much more enjoyable. And then it turns into a murder mystery with a dash of thriller, as it transpires that a good deal of the plot is being orchestrated by the mysterious Director. Dum dum dum…

All in all, this is a lot of fun. It took a little while for me to be convinced that I was actually reading a mystery novel – I don’t know enough about Christopher St John Sprigg to know if this was going to have a whodunit element in it – but it becomes more and more gripping as the book progresses. Although the villain isn’t remotely clued…

Another book where the less you know going in the better – and as it’s been reissued by Valancourt Books (who I guess thought it was a ghost story – it’s not), why not give it a try? Highly Recommended.

2 comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.