Ridiculously Complicated Puzzle Time – the answers

Well, I’ve tortured you long enough with last week’s puzzle, so it’s time for the answers. Just a reminder – the puzzle consisted of finding key words from the titles of Golden Age detective mysteries all from a certain year and then using the unused letters to find an book and author from the same year. Simple.

So, if you want to try the puzzle, look away now. But the words in question were:

  • Death on the NILE
  • DUMB WITNESS
  • DANCERS in MOURNING
  • Death in the HOPFIELDS
  • Death on the BOARD
  • PROCEED with CAUTION
  • Death at the CLUB
  • Murder in CROWN PASSAGE
  • FOUND FLOATING
  • The Case of the MISSING MINUTES
  • The Case of the HANGING ROPE
  • A MINOR OPERATION
  • The BURNING COURT
  • The FOUR FALSE WEAPONS
  • The TEN TEACUPS
  • The PUNCH and JUDY Murders
  • TRIAL and ERROR
  • DISGRACE to the COLLEGE
  • The MISSING AUNT
  • The HIGH SHERIFF
  • The Mystery of Mr JESSOP
  • The DUSKY HOUR
  • COME AWAY, Death
  • THERE’S TROUBLE BREWING

Those books were, respectively, by Agatha Christie, Margery Allingham, John Rhode, Miles Burton, Freeman Wills Crofts, Christopher Bush, J J Connington, John Dickson Carr, Carter Dickson, Anthony Berkeley, G D H & M Coles, Henry Wade, E R Punshon, Gladys Mitchell and Nicholas Blake.

The grid, after you’ve found those words (apparently TEN appears twice – oops – so you have to find the right one), looks like this:

The remaining letters read from top to bottom, left to right, spell out THE MAN WHO WASN’T THERE BY ANTHONY GILBERT. Which is the answer.

Well done to those who got it right – when I think of a different format, there will be something else along soon to pass the time. Or I’ll just do another one of these…

3 comments

  1. You have not mentioned in your puzzle that the title of the final novel and its author’s name are separated by the preposition BY. As a result, I wasted a lot of time trying to figure out the 2 extra letters B and Y !

    Like

  2. Great puzzle – I didn’t quite get there even with the help of GA Detection wiki. Just shows how busy JDC was around that year.

    Like

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